Local Time : 03:13 CET

A-440 10:30

Introduction

G. Villeirs; Gent/BE

Learning Objectives

1. To learn more about various topics presented by eminent Belgian radiologists.
2. To illustrate imaging applications in the Belgian context.
3. To show the diversity of emergency radiology.

Abstract

Introduction to the "European Society of Radiology (ESR) Meets Belgium" session, by the President of the Belgian Society or Radiology. During this session, various topics in emergency medicine will be presented and illustrated by eminent Belgian radiologists. The session will also be animated by an interlude about radiology of Belgian food and a video about the Belgian Museum of Radiology.

A-441 10:35

Additional value of dual-energy CT in abdominal emergencies

E. Danse; Brussels/BE

Learning Objectives

1. To explain the basics of dual-energy CT.
2. To illustrate the application of dual-energy CT in the abdominal emergency setting.
3. To demonstrate the incremental value of dual-energy CT in abdominal emergencies.

Abstract

CT plays a major role in the management of emergency situations. Its role is increased because the diagnostic performance of imaging methods takes benefit of the continuous technological CT improvements. Our goal is to present our recent experience of using spectral CT for the diagnostic workup of adult patients admitted for acute abdominal disorders. This presentation will be focused on the main applications of the spectral modalities for the diagnostic management of patients having severe trauma with abdominal consequence, suspicion of acute intestinal ischaemia, bowel obstruction, acute renal disorders (renal colic, acute pyelonephritis, renal infarct), acute pancreatitis and biliary tract disorders and some uncommon situations. Some basic key points about the spectral technique and the imaging flow management will also be presented.

A-442 10:55

High-end CT imaging in forensic medicine: experience after recent Brussels terror attacks

W. Develter; Leuven/BE
Sorry
no recording
available

Learning Objectives

1. To learn more about the challenges in forensic medicine after major calamities.
2. To explain the need for high-end CT imaging in forensic medicine.
3. To illustrate the value of high-end CT in the aftermath of the Brussels terror attacks.

Abstract

"No abstract submitted."

A-443 11:15

Interlude: Imaging Belgian food

K. Verstraete; Ghent/BE

Learning Objectives

-

Abstract

The purpose of this lecture is to present the imaging characteristics of a classical Belgian meal, including delicious Belgian desserts and beers. The methods used are plain radiography, CT and MR imaging. Results show the different absorption and resonance characteristics of Belgian food and drinks. Attendants should try to guess what we eat and drink by analysing the images.

A-444 11:25

Imaging genetics and beyond: facial reconstruction and identification

P. Claes; Leuven/BE

Learning Objectives

1. To demonstrate the application of imaging in genetic assessment.
2. To illustrate the use of imaging for identification.
3. To illustrate the use of imaging after facial reconstruction.

Abstract

The phenotypic complement to genomics is phenomics which aims to obtain high-throughput and high-dimensional phenotyping. The paradigm shift is simple and similar to the one made in the human genome project, instead of ‘phenotyping as usual’ or measuring a limited set of simplified features that seem relevant, why not measure it all? With the advent of ever more consumer-worn sensors, the technological hardware exists for extensively (wide variety of measurements from different sensors) and intensively (in great detail and high resolution) collecting quantitative phenotypic data. In my research, e.g. 3D surface imaging and medical scanning devices, provide the optimal means to capture information of human morphology and appearance to the level of phenomics. In this seminar, I guide you through the science and the complexities of imaging genetics and elaborate on the genetic architecture of the human brain and face captured using MRI and 3D surface scanning, respectively. I will illustrate a computational framework that is able to match given faces to probe DNA. This facilitates the ability to perform facial identification and/or verification from DNA. Towards the future, this will generate innovative applications in forensics and biometrics, arming investigators with new and powerful tools to establish human identity from DNA.

A-445 11:45

Interlude: The Belgian Museum of Radiology

R. Van Tiggelen; Brussels/BE

Learning Objectives

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Abstract

Some years ago, the Science Museum of London performed a survey among the visitors on the most important discoveries in medicine. Out of over 40,000 answers, radiology was number one. Radiology came ahead of, e.g. the discovery of penicillin of the description of DNA. This was a supplementary reason why we created, in 1990, the Belgian Museum of Radiology. Remember also that radiology is used in many fields in medicine and in many fields different from medicine . It is a fact that due to radiology, more than 30 Nobel Laureates have gained their prizes with the practical implementation of this technology. In the world, museums of radiology are rather scarce. What we do and what you can see in our institution is developed with the projection of our short video. We hope to see you in the near future.

11:50

Panel discussion: Acute pathology: emergency radiologists or organ subspecialists?

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no recording
available

(no abstract)