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EM 2 - Precision imaging and patient experience

Saturday, March 4, 10:30 - 12:00 Room: B Session Type: ESR meets the United States of America Topics: Evidence-Based Imaging, Management/Leadership Digital Evaluation: Open Digital Evaluation for this Session Moderators: J. A. Brink (Boston/US), R. L. Ehman (Rochester/US), P. M. Parizel (Antwerp/BE) Add session to my schedule In your schedule (remove)

A-654 10:30

Introduction (part 1)

P. M. Parizel; Antwerp/BE

Learning Objectives

1. To document the growing significance of clinical decision support software for radiologists.
2. To demonstrate how radiologists can use quantitative imaging biomarkers to enhance their role in scientific research and clinical practice.
3. To illustrate how ACR and RSNA are helping radiologists to provide better patient-centred care and improve patient experience with medical imaging.

Abstract

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A-655 10:35

Introduction (part 2)

J. A. Brink; Boston/US

Learning Objectives

1. To document the growing significance of clinical decision support software for radiologists.
2. To demonstrate how radiologists can use quantitative imaging biomarkers to enhance their role in scientific research and clinical practice.
3. To illustrate how ACR and RSNA are helping radiologists to provide better patient-centred care and improve patient experience with medical imaging.

Abstract

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A-656 10:40

Introduction (part 3)

R. L. Ehman; Rochester/US

Learning Objectives

1. To document the growing significance of clinical decision support software for radiologists.
2. To demonstrate how radiologists can use quantitative imaging biomarkers to enhance their role in scientific research and clinical practice.
3. To illustrate how ACR and RSNA are helping radiologists to provide better patient-centred care and improve patient experience with medical imaging.

Abstract

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A-657 10:45

Clinical decision support

K. J. Dreyer; Boston/US

Learning Objectives

1. To understand how decision support systems may improve appropriate utilisation of medical imaging.
2. To understand the role of decision support systems in reducing variation in radiologists’ reporting.
3. To consider future opportunities for decision support for medical imaging.

Abstract

As computers outperform humans at complex cognitive tasks, disruptive innovation will increasingly remap the familiar with waves of creative destruction. In healthcare, nowhere is this more apparent or imminent than at the crossroads of radiology and the emerging field of clinical data science. As leaders in our field, we must shepherd the innovations of cognitive computing by defining its role within diagnostic imaging, while first and foremost ensuring the continued safety of our patients. If we are dismissive, defensive or self-motivated - industry, payers and provider entities will innovate around us achieving different forms of disruption, optimised to serve their own needs. To maintain our leadership position, as we enter the era of machine learning, it is essential that we serve our patients by directly managing the use of clinical data science towards the improvement of care—a position which will only strengthen our relevance in the care process as well as in future federal, commercial and accountable care discussions. In this session, we will explore the state of clinical data science in medical imaging and its potential to improve the quality and relevance of radiology as well as the lives of our patients.

11:05

Interlude/Commentary: Future directions in decision support (ESR/ACR/RSNA Leaders)

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no recording
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(no abstract)

A-658 11:10

Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance

E. F. Jackson; Madison/US

Learning Objectives

1. To understand the need for quantitative imaging biomarkers in clinical trials and clinical practice.
2. To understand key challenges to the implementation of standardised quantitative imaging techniques.
3. To describe some of the current approaches to resolving such key challenges.

Abstract

The RSNA quantitative imaging biomarkers alliance (QIBA, www.rsna.org/qiba) unites imaging scientists, healthcare professionals and industry and regulatory stakeholders to advance quantitative imaging and the use of quantitative imaging biomarkers (QIBs) in clinical trials and clinical practice. The QIBA mission is to improve the value and practicality of QIBs by reducing variability across devices, patients and time. This mission is accomplished by 1) collaborating to develop, test, and promulgate methods for obtaining consistent and valid QIB results across imaging platforms, clinical sites, and time and 2) accelerating the development and adoption of hardware and software standards needed to achieve accurate and reproducible QIB results. The work of QIBA is accomplished primarily by stakeholder volunteers who contribute to the efforts of four modality-specific coordinating committees (CT, MR, nuclear medicine, ultrasound) and twelve biomarker committees. In addition, a metrology work group has developed standard terminology and a rigorous statistical framework for research and clinical applications of QIBs. Selected QIBs that are considered to be transformational, translational, feasible, practical and collaborative are addressed by profiles, which are technical standards that include one or more performance claims and inform users what quantitative results can be achieved by following the profile. Sources of bias and variance, and methods to minimize each, are considered in profile development. This presentation will summarize the goals and objectives of QIBA, including international efforts. The QIBA perspective on opportunities for QIB applications in the practice of precision medicine, challenges to be overcome, and approaches to addressing such challenges will be presented.

11:30

Interlude/Commentary: Future directions in quantitative imaging (ESR/ACR/RSNA Leaders)

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no recording
available

(no abstract)

A-659 11:35

Imaging 3.0/Radiology Cares (part 1)

G. McGinty; New York/US

Learning Objectives

1. To understand the principles of the Imaging 3.0 initiative.
2. To understand the principles of the Radiology Cares initiative.
3. To consider potential opportunities for improved patient experience with medical imaging.

Abstract

This session will describe campaigns that have been created by professional radiology organisations in the US to promote patient-centred practice and a thoughtful understanding of the radiologist’s role in shaping care delivery and improving the health of the patients they serve. The session will describe resources and tools that have been created for these campaigns which may be useful to the radiology community worldwide. The radiology cares campaign, developed by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) focuses on optimising the experience of patients during their radiologic care. Through online resources and educational materials the initiative helps radiologists take patient-centred radiology from concept to practice. The imaging 3.0 campaign of the American College of Radiology (ACR) was designed as a blueprint for the future of radiology as the US healthcare delivery system transitions from a volume-based payment methodology to a value-based one. Its specific aim is to position the radiologist as the steward of appropriate imaging and an integral member of the care delivery team. Together these efforts aim to refocus radiologists’ practice around the patient’s needs rather than those of the physician and staff. An important component of both campaigns has been the development of tools such as the RadiologyInfo site that teaches patients about their imaging care as well as data registries such as the dose index registry that allows radiologists to benchmark against peers and measure quality improvement efforts. These campaigns have also helped promote advocacy efforts to include meaningful value-based incentives and metrics for radiologists.

A-660 11:45

Imaging 3.0/Radiology Cares (part 2)

R. L. Ehman; Rochester/US

Learning Objectives

1. To understand the principles of the Imaging 3.0 initiative.
2. To understand the principles of the Radiology Cares initiative.
3. To consider potential opportunities for improved patient experience with medical imaging.

Abstract

This session will describe campaigns that have been created by professional radiology organizations in the US to promote patient-centred practice and a thoughtful understanding of the radiologist’s role in shaping care delivery and improving the health of the patients they serve. The session will describe resources and tools that have been created for these campaigns which may be useful to the radiology community worldwide. The Radiology Cares campaign, developed by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) focuses on optimizing the experience of patients during their radiologic care. Through online resources and educational materials the initiative helps radiologists take patient-centred radiology from concept to practice. The Imaging 3.0 campaign of the American College of Radiology (ACR) was designed as a blueprint for the future of radiology as the US healthcare delivery system transitions from a volume-based payment methodology to a value-based one. Its specific aim is to position the radiologist as the steward of appropriate imaging and an integral member of the care delivery team. Together these efforts aim to refocus radiologists’ practice around the patient’s needs rather than those of the physician and staff. An important component of both campaigns has been the development of tools such as the RadiologyInfo site that teaches patients about their imaging care as well as data registries such as the dose index registry that allows radiologists to benchmark against peers and measure quality improvement efforts. These campaigns have also helped promote advocacy efforts to include meaningful value-based incentives and metrics for radiologists.

11:55

Interlude/Commentary: Future directions in patient experience (ESR/ACR/RSNA Leaders)

Sorry
no recording
available

(no abstract)