Powered by
06:09 CET
PC 13 - Closing the gap between education and clinical practice for radiographers
Professional Issues Radiographers Education Evidence-Based Imaging
Saturday, March 3, 08:30 - 10:00
Room: K
Moderators: K. G. Vikestad (Oslo/NO), M. Raissaki (Iraklion/GR)
A-657
08:30
Chairpersons' introduction (part 1)
K. G. Vikestad; Oslo/NO
Learning Objectives

1. To understand the need for updated methods of training radiographers in the context of modern technology.
2. To discuss existing differences and controversies in the education system and teaching methods.
3. To explore possible ways of collaboration between academic institutions and hospitals for optimal education.

Abstract

This session, professional changes, focuses on the gap between education and clinical practice in radiography. At the end of the session, we will discuss the challenges and aim to come up with suggestions to reduce this gap. Three speakers are invited; they will present their perspective on the topic to open the minds of the audience and provide some new thoughts. The speakers are: Anne Bjørnstad, Norway; Eric Wolker Van Der Weij, the Netherlands; and Louise Rainford, Ireland. The speakers represent both the clinical and educational field of radiography. Anne will present how the clinical field views the competence level of the newly graduated radiographers when they start working at Oslo University Hospital and what kinds of competence are important for the clinical field right now. She will also provide some reflections on whether or not specialisation should be part of the bachelor's degree. Eric will give a presentation about a new method for preparing students for clinical practice. They have starting using this method at his university, and he will share his thoughts and experiences in using this method. The title of the presentation by Lousie is “Tools for success - academic and clinical practice working together”. Her focus will be on how to emphasize variation of combined education and training, how to explore collaboration between hospitals and universities, and finally how undergraduate research can enhance academic/clinical relationships.

A-658
08:33
Chairpersons' introduction (part 2)
M. Raissaki; Iraklion/GR
Learning Objectives

1. To understand the need for updated methods of training radiographers in the context of modern technology.
2. To discuss existing differences and controversies in the education system and teaching methods.
3. To explore possible ways of collaboration between academic institutions and hospitals for optimal education.

Abstract

Competence refers to what a health specialist is capable of doing in his/her daily clinical practice. To achieve competence, a health specialist in a radiology department should acquire sufficient knowledge of various aspects of anatomy, physiology, physics, radiography and medicine. Performance refers to what a health specialist actually does. Performance is associated with much more than knowledge including ethics, interpersonal relationships, clinical skills, empathy for patients and ability to perform diagnostic tests as safely and efficiently as possible. Living in the era of evidence-based medicine, personalized medicine and ALARA has enhanced the role of the radiographer into a highly-skilled health specialist coping with multiple tasks in demanding environments. Academic activity composes a triangle formed by research, teaching and clinical practice. Teaching is considered one of the most challenging and endangered aspects of academic activities because of continuous changes in the methods of education, technology and patient management. Excellence in performance is the ultimate goal of education throughout pre- and postgraduate teaching programmes, and the possibility of new learning platforms might prove useful in the effort to close the gap between education and clinical practice for radiographers.

A-659
08:35
Education vs clinical practice
A. Bjørnstad; Oslo/NO
Learning Objectives

1. To understand the different perspectives of theoretical education and practical training of radiographers.
2. To appreciate means of rapid acquisition of clinical skills during education.
3. To discuss the possibility and potential of sub-specialisation during education.

Abstract

Newly qualified diagnostic radiographers’ knowledge, skills and competencies do not comply with the expectations and demands of the health care sector in Norway. Continual developments in technology and the changing role of the radiographer create a need for restructuring of radiography education.To ensure that newly qualified diagnostic radiographers meet the expectations of the clinical site , the Learning outcomes of radiography education should be reevaluated. The level of clinical competencies diagnostic radiographers are expected to have achieved on completion of their education should be revised. This process cannot be initiated without a closer evaluation of the employer´s role and responsibility. The employer should consider how the training of both students and newly qualified radiographers is organized. The evaluation of the required competencies of a clinical diagnostic radiographer should be an ongoing and dynamic process. To Ensure satisfactory quality of both the academic studies and the clinical training, the collaboration between the educational institutions and clinical placement locations should be improved. Also, the competence of the clinical practice supervisors should be strengthened. Technological advances and the increasing complexity of radiographic procedures demand a continuous increase in competencies beyond the bachelor education. This raises the question; should the bachelor degree include specialization in specific areas within the field of diagnostic radiography or should this remain as a mandatory part of continuing professional development.

A-660
08:58
How can new teaching methods be implemented?
E. Wolters van der Weij; Groningen/NL
Learning Objectives

1. To understand the different pedagogical methods available for the education of radiographers.
2. To discuss the advantages and disadvantages of expert lectures for education.
3. To demonstrate how EBP can be integrated into the training curriculum.

Abstract

Serious Gaming! Didactics is the scientific discipline that deals with the question of how teachers can train knowledge, practical skills and attitude to students. Thirty years ago, education was more teacher controlled which is often associated with passive learning. Currently, activating or self-directed learning are the didactic methods which place the student more in a central position. Self-directed learning is a process in which the student himself takes the initiative for the learning process: the student plans, tests, evaluates and reflects with or without the help of others. Recent scientific literature indicates that contemporary or present-day young people (the so-called network generation) learn in a different way. Authenticity, multitasking, interactivity and gaming are some key concepts. Education does not have to be entirely different, but could be better adapted to this generation of students by new forms of education like serious gaming. The department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy (MIRT) of the Hanze University of Applied Science has started implementing serious gaming in their educational programme in 2015. How and to what extent can serious gaming be used in the Dutch education system for radiographers as a new didactic instrument whose implementation may lead to improvement,or complement or replace current traditional approaches and methods?

A-661
09:21
Tools for success: academic and clinical practice working together
L. Rainford; Dublin/IE
Learning Objectives

1. To emphasise variation of combined education and training among different academic institutions.
2. To explore collaboration between hospitals and universities for the preparation of radiographers.
3. To discuss how undergraduate research can enhance academic/clinical relationships.

Abstract

This presentation will address the three learning outcomes listed; the principal focus of the talk will be on undergraduate radiography education. An overview will be provided on how education and clinical training of radiography students vary across academic institutions, both within Europe and also internationally, and the implications of these variations upon the profession. The presenter will explore potential best practice models for collaboration between clinical centres and universities in the delivery of radiography training. Reflection upon day-to-day considerations required to run local and national training programmes will be included. Practical difficulties will be discussed and possible mechanisms for enhance into radiography training proffered. A discussion of how undergraduate research activity could possibly support and enhance academic /clinical relationships will be offered to the audience to stimulate further conversation. Reference will be made to initiatives currently employed across a number of training programmes with the permission of the academic institutions.

09:44
Panel discussion: What is the motivation for change?