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A-107

Chairmen's introduction (part 1)

L. Bonomo; Rome/IT
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no recording
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Learning Objectives

1. To describe the role of the UEMS within the EU.
2. To understand the difference between ESR and UEMS.
3. To understand the importance of cooperation between ESR and UEMS.

Abstract

The UEMS - European Union of Medical Specialists is the oldest European medical organisation representing the interests of more than 50 different medical specialities and involving more than 1.6 million of healthcare professionals. The ESR - European Society of Radiology is the world's biggest radiological society, encompassing 67.500 members from 155 different countries. It was founded in 2005 by merging the European Congress of Radiology and the European Association of Radiology, aiming at establishing a single, powerful and unified voice for European radiologists. Through the section of radiology, UEMS and ESR share the same ambitious objective of promoting the highest quality of care and medical practice in radiology, by serving the needs of patients and general public, harmonizing radiological training and defending free movement and professional interests of European radiologists. This Joint Session will focus in particular on the function of the UEMS section of radiology within EU institutions and legislation, with specific regard to the harmonisation of radiological training, to the definition of clear boundaries towards other specialities and to the competence-based format of European Training Curricula. It will further investigate the value of European Diploma in Radiology, the impact of professional qualifications directive on radiologists and the importance of joint effort for EU lobbying and interest representation. Finally, particular attention will be dedicated to the working methodologies of EACCME (European Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education) and ACI (Accreditation Council in Imaging) in the framework of CME - Continuing Medical Education and CPD - Continuing Professional Development programmes.

A-108

Chairmen's introduction (part 2)

P. Ricci; Rome/IT
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no recording
available

Learning Objectives

1. To describe the role of the UEMS within the EU.
2. To understand the difference between ESR and UEMS.
3. To understand the importance of cooperation between ESR and UEMS.

Abstract

The UEMS - European Union of Medical Specialists is the oldest European medical organisation representing the interests of more than 50 different medical specialities and involving more than 1.6 million of healthcare professionals. The ESR - European Society of Radiology is the world´s biggest radiological society, encompassing 67.500 members from 155 different countries. It was founded in 2005 by merging the European Congress of Radiology and the European Association of Radiology, aiming at establishing a single, powerful and unified voice for European radiologists. Through the section of radiology, UEMS and ESR share the same ambitious objective of promoting the highest quality of care and medical practice in radiology, by serving the needs of patients and general public, harmonizing radiological training and defending free movement and professional interests of European radiologists. This Joint Session will focus in particular on the function of the UEMS section of radiology within EU institutions and legislation, with specific regard to the harmonisation of radiological training, to the definition of clear boundaries towards other specialities and to the competence-based format of European Training Curricula. It will further investigate the value of European Diploma in Radiology, the impact of professional qualifications directive on radiologists and the importance of joint effort for EU lobbying and interest representation. Finally, particular attention will be dedicated to the working methodologies of EACCME (European Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education) and ACI (Accreditation Council in Imaging) in the framework of CME - Continuing Medical Education and CPD - Continuing Professional Development programmes.

A-109

Structure of the UEMS and position of the UEMS within the EU

B. Maillet; Brussels/BE

Learning Objectives

1. To understand the structure of the UEMS and the position of the UEMS radiology section within the UEMS.
2. To understand the UEMS political involvement in EU affairs.
3. To understand the influence of EU directives on national legislation and daily practice.

Abstract

The harmonisation of post graduate training in Europe: a challenge for the medical profession. The diploma in medicine is automatically recognised in the European Union but for the specialities things are different, the European directive on recognition of Professional qualification has an Annex V where the specialities are listed that can be enjoying automatic recognition if the speciality is mentioned as recognised in the home as well as the host country. This is only the case for 19 specialities that are recognised in all the EU Member States while for other specialities it varies from country to country. Until now, the only criterion that is taken into account is the length of training while it would be also good to include competences, and that is the reason why the UEMS is working on the European Training Requirements (ETR) for all the specialities that are mentioned in Annex V. The UEMS is also working for more than ten years now to increase the harmonisation of training by developing European exams in those specialities and this through the Council for European Specialist Medical Assessment (CESMA). Of course being licensed to practice is not the endpoint of the learning process and afterwards, the physician should demonstrate that he or she is working on keeping up to date his or her knowledge, skills and attitudes and here the UEMS has created the European Accreditation Council for Continuous Medical Education (EACCME) to harmonise the process of CME-CPD accreditation also at European level.

A-110

Harmonising radiology training in Europe (part I)

P. Ricci; Rome/IT

Learning Objectives

1. To become familiar with Chapter 6 and the current competence-based European Training Curricula.
2. To learn about the Council for European Specialist Medical Assessment (CESMA).

Abstract

Free exchange of persons and services within the European medical sector has been achieved by mutual recognition of basic and specialist medical qualifications brought into effect by the Commission of the European Communities in 1975. The directives have been consolidated in the Directive 93/16/EEC of 5 April 1993, establishing a European training charter for medical specialists. The charter describes the requirements for adequate training, which prepares specialists for practice of their speciality at an appropriate level in any EU member state. The same charter divides the requirements regarding content of training into a general part, defined by the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), and a specific part for each recognized speciality, defined by the UEMS Specialized Sections (Chapter 6). For the speciality of radiology, the charter states radiology involves all aspects of medical imaging which provide information about the anatomy, pathology and function of normal and disease states and interventional techniques for diagnosis and minimally invasive therapy involving image-guided systems. The Council for European Specialist Medical Assessment (CESMA) is an advisory body of the UEMS created in 2007 with an aim to provide recommendation and advice on the organisation of European examinations and improve the quality of European postgraduate training examinations. Its main tasks include: to promote harmonisation of European board assessments, to provide guidelines to the boards on the conduct of assessments, to encourage take up of board assessments as a quality mark, and to offer an alternative to national assessments, where appropriate.

A-111

Harmonising radiology training in Europe (part II)

L. Oleaga Zufiría; Barcelona/ES

Learning Objectives

1. To learn about the different levels of curricula within radiology on a European level.
2. To understand the importance of endorsement of the curriculum by the UEMS Council (i.e. the importance to secure and defend the practice of radiology against hostile take-over by other specialties).
3. To know about the value of the European Diploma in Radiology (EDiR).

Abstract

The European Training Curriculum (ETC) represents a guide to standardize education and harmonize skills and competencies among radiologists in Europe. The ETC outlines a five-year training period to acquire the knowledge to practice radiology, consisting of Level I training over the first three years, followed by Level II training, with potential special interest rotations during the last two years. Level III corresponds to full subspeciality training with consecutive subspecialization after this five-year training period. It is important to satisfy the needs and integrity of the radiology profession, to avoid fragmentation and take over by other specialities. Endorsement of the curriculum by the UEMS Council is critical to provide support to the defense of the profession and as a guaranty of training, to assure quality and safety in radiology practice. The European Diploma in Radiology (EDIR) is available to radiologists and radiology residents in their fifth year of training. To certify knowledge and competency in line with the ESR ETC for radiology, it represents a valuable additional qualification and a recognised certificate to standardize and facilitate the accreditation of radiologists across the EU borders.

A-112

Recognition of qualifications (part I)

B. Maillet1, Z. Fras2; 1 / 2 Ljubljana/SI

Learning Objectives

1. To know about the EU Directive on Professional Qualifications Recognition.

Abstract

"No abstract submitted."

A-113

Recognition of qualifications (part II)

E. J. Adam; London/UK

Learning Objectives

1. To know how ESR is involved in the political lobby at the EU using the EU Directive on Professional Qualifications Recognition as an example.
2. To understand the importance of cooperation between ESR and UEMS using the EU Directive on Electromagnetic fields as an example.

Abstract

The ESR is actively engaged in EU affairs related to radiology, with an office in Brussels. Only by direct engagement can the profession's voice be heard. The EU Directive on Professional Qualifications aims to facilitate the free movement of some professionals, including doctors within the EU. The ESR has been active in consultations on this subject and, alongside the UEMS, broadly supports the aims of the directive. However, it has emphasised that quality should not be compromised, and that language issues and differences in radiological training across the EU should be acknowledged. Fortunately the European training curriculum developed by the ESR is a potential means of addressing the latter together with the EDiR examination. Both are supported by the UEMS, as tools to promote uniform standards. Collaboration between the ESR and UEMS has been very successful in the past, and this is another area where a unified approach and shared goals may prove fruitful.

A-114

Continuing professional development (CPD) (part I)

M. Adriaensen; Heerlen/NL

Learning Objectives

1. To learn about the European Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (EACCME®).
2. To understand why an international independent, dual reviewing process is important.
3. To know about the existence of European CME Credit (ECMEC®).

Abstract

Continuing Professional Development (CPD) has been defined as the educative means of updating, developing and enhancing how doctors apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes required in their daily practice. In January 2000, the European Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (EACCME®) was established by the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS) with the aim of encouraging high standards in the development, delivery and harmonisation of Continuing Medical Education (CME) by the establishment of an independent, dual, peer-reviewed system for the accreditation of international CME events and international recognition of CME credit points, i.e. European CME credits (ECMEC®s). The EACCME® also provides for accreditation of e-learning materials. The EACCME® is solely financed by the application fees paid by CPD-providers. Independent accreditation, based on cooperation of all medical specialities, is important to foster professional autonomy and self-regulation, and deliver high-quality CME with the ultimate goal to assure high-quality patient care.

A-115

Continuing professional development (CPD) (part II)

D. Negru; Iasi/RO

Learning Objectives

1. To learn about the set-up and structure of the Accreditation Council in Imaging (ACI).
2. To understand the importance of cooperation with and recognition by the EACCME®.

Abstract

In January 2016, the ACI was officially launched. It was established under the umbrella of the European Board of Radiology (EBR) to cooperate and collaborate with the accreditation council of the UEMS, the European Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (EACCME). The structure of the ACI, whose committees are composed of active experts in radiology, members of the EBR and the UEMS Radiology Section, allows to maximise the synergies between both organisations. Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is considered a cornerstone of quality assurance in medical care and recognition by the EACCME® is a contributing factor as well as a necessary step towards European harmonisation of educational standards in radiology.

Questions

Sorry
no recording
available

(no abstract)

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