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ESR-PAG 1 - Improving patient safety and quality of care in clinical radiology

Saturday, March 4, 10:30 - 12:00 Room: L 8 Session Type: ESR Patient Advisory Group (ESR-PAG) Topics: Radiographers, Management/Leadership, Professional Issues Moderators: N. Bedlington (Vienna/AT), B. E. Kelly (Belfast/UK) Add session to my schedule In your schedule (remove)

A-664

Chairmen's introduction (part 1)

N. Bedlington; Vienna/AT
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Learning Objectives

1. To understand how ESR is improving patient safety and quality of care through audit and standards.
2. To explore concrete examples of best practice on implementing these standards in the radiology department and how these might be replicated.

Abstract

This session will focus on improving patient safety and quality of care in clinical radiology. Different presentations will be included. The first one will present the work of the ESR Audit & Standards Subcommittee in collaboration with the ESR Patient Advisory Group. It will highlight methods and examples of good practice and how to improve the patient-doctor relationship. Thereafter, the patients' perspective will be provided with a focus on the driver diagram as well as on information over-/underload. The final presentation is dedicated to the implementation of a patient satisfaction questionnaire in the radiology department. It will point out the benefits of patient satisfaction assessment and how to understand the gathered feedback. The session will conclude with a panel discussion.

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Chairmen's introduction (part 2)

B. E. Kelly; Belfast/UK
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no recording
available

Learning Objectives

1. To understand how ESR is improving patient safety and quality of care through audit and standards.
2. To explore concrete examples of best practice on implementing these standards in the radiology department and how these might be replicated.

Abstract

Audit measures something against an agreed standard. As radiological health care professionals, we tend to think of this as equipment and process driven. Whilst this is an important component, audit can, and should, also be used to measure our interaction with each other and with our patients. By doing this, we ensure that a patient-centred approach leads to a safe, professional and harmonious institution.

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The work of the ESR Audit & Standards Subcommittee in collaboration with ESR-PAG

B. E. Kelly; Belfast/UK

Learning Objectives

1. To become familiar with methods and examples of good practice and on how to improve the patient-doctor relationship.
2. To understand the need for balance between professional responsibility and patient autonomy.

Abstract

A driver diagram (DD) is used to conceptualise an issue and to determine its system components, thus creating a pathway to achieve the goal of patient-centred care. The DD that shall be discussed provides guidance on how to embed this patient-centred care within radiology departments for the benefit of all. One way to measure patient contentment is with a patient satisfaction questionnaire. Such a document has been produced by Dr Dominque Carrie. This has been reviewed and refined by both the Patient Advisory Group and the Audit committees and will be disseminated to radiology departments throughout Europe. Overwhelming evidence shows that doctors are patients too. Ten percent of medical students and doctors have significant psychological and dependency issues. Two percent are bipolar and one percent suicidal. In addition it is known that these traits are longstanding, continuing from school, college, university through long medical careers. It is vital, for professional, pastoral and ethical reasons that these issues are recognised and treated.

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Patients' perspective (part I)

D. Walsh; Dublin/IE

Learning Objectives

1. To learn that implementing the driver diagram in their department will be a step-by-step process that can be monitored by patients.
2. To learn that a fair knowledge of the upcoming procedure is part of feeling safe for the patient.
3. To learn that an overload of information is equally detrimental to a safe feeling as no information, putting the patient central means an adjusted offering of information.

Abstract

This presentation will explore what neurology patients view as 'quality care', using examples of good and bad radiology practice from relevant disease areas. It will then question if such good practice can be further enabled - and bad practice minimized - through patient involvement in monitoring the implementation of the driver diagram. To facilitate this process, good communication between doctor, patient and the wider multidisciplinary team is essential, and this will be considered from the patient perspective. The presentation will aim to analyse the potential phases of patient involvement, for example, including ways to identify the most relevant patient-reported outcome measures, and ways to collect and analyse patient-generated evidence. The evidence - in this case, a patient relevant audit of driver diagram implementation - must then be disseminated to allow prospective patients to engage in more informed decision-making in their approach to choosing treatment and management options, e.g. services, treatment centres and health care professionals.

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Patients' perspective (part II)

E. Briers; Hasselt/BE

Learning Objectives

1. To learn that implementing the driver diagram in their department will be a step-by-step process that can be monitored by patients.
2. To learn that a fair knowledge of the upcoming procedure is part of feeling safe for the patient.
3. To learn that an overload of information is equally detrimental to a safe feeling as no information, putting the patient central means an adjusted offering of information.

Abstract

The perfect radiology department does not exist there is always room for improvement. The driver diagram can be seen as an inventory of good practice objectives. A comparison between this standard and the actual situation in the department should show weak point and elements to be improved. Ideally this is realised through a good set of procedures (ISO meaning) that guide the work in the department. These procedures need verification in the execution. In this, patients play a vital role as they go where radiologists do not go and they undergo the procedures. To ensure patients a safe and comfortable journey through the department they need to know and understand what they are up to. Patients present themselves to the department they are sent by a clinician with a diagnostic issue. The diagnostic issues are very diverse from a simple broken wrist to a cancer diagnosis. The patients on the other hand have different levels of literacy and on top of that different level of coping. This boils down to the fact that there is not one answer that will fit all patient and diagnostics needs. What is not enough information for one patient is an overload for another and overload is as bad as no information at all as it makes the patient deaf to new and potentially important info. Good information is provided at the level of the individual patient with adequate complexity, respect and compassion for the intellectually underprivileged.

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Example of good practice: implementing a patient satisfaction questionnaire in your radiology department

D. Carrié; Toulouse/FR

Learning Objectives

1. To understand the benefits of patient satisfaction assessment.
2. To learn how to implement a questionnaire (means to be used, items to estimate).
3. To understand the feedback you will obtain.

Abstract

Patients of modern medical imaging require from us doctors radiologists, very high-quality technical performances, carried out on the most modern equipment, in complete efficiency and safety. They also demand that they are carried out as quickly as possible, in pleasant places, by well-trained staff attentive to all their requests. For 9 years, in our department of medical imaging in Toulouse (France), it has, therefore, appeared necessary to assess their satisfaction by a questionnaire after they benefited from a diagnostic or interventional (CT or MRI) imaging. This experience showed us that it is easy to implement such a questionnaire in any structure of medical imaging. The proposed items may be discussed between radiologists, with the service personnel, with patient-users organisations you know, in relation to the supposed expectations of your patients and potential problems or limits to each structure (for example, appointment delays, times of waiting, results retrieval, direct access to the radiologist). The questions must be simple and understandable by each patient. For the responses obtained to be sufficiently numerous and representative, incentives to respond to the questionnaires must be implemented (proposed systematically after any delivery of the result for instance). The results obtained must be regularly collated, their evolution over time analysed, modifications in your daily practice implemented, their presentation to the entire team regularly made. This allows us to better understand the expectations of our patients, to improve our practices to satisfy them better, and thus offer a radiology service closer to them.

Panel discussion: Does your department perform well in patient-centred care?

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no recording
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(no abstract)

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