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08:33 CET
RC 114 - Forensic imaging
Radiographers Forensic Imaging
Wednesday, February 28, 08:30 - 10:00
Room: K
Moderators: J. McNulty (Dublin/IE), R. R. van Rijn (Amsterdam/NL)

A-037
08:30
Chairpersons' introduction (part 1)
J. McNulty; Dublin/IE
Learning Objectives

1. To provide insights into the role of imaging, and radiographers, in forensic imaging and mass fatality incidents.
2. To appreciate the key aspects of a quality forensic imaging service.
3. To understand the challenges associated with forensic imaging.

Abstract

Radiographers play an essential role in the provision of high quality forensic imaging services. This is recognised in many countries and forensic imaging has been recognised by the European federation of radiographer societies (EFRS) as one of nine specialist areas of advanced practice for radiographers. While the concept of optimisation is at the heart of the profession, there remains room for improvement in further advancing optimisation for forensic applications. As with all specialist areas, or areas of advanced practice, appropriate education and training, and continuous professional development are fundamental. Through international organisations such as the international society for forensic radiology and imaging (ISFRI) and the international association of forensic radiographers (IAFR), together with national organisations and groups, forensic imaging continues to move in the right direction.

A-038
08:33
Chairpersons' introduction (part 2)
R. R. van Rijn; Amsterdam/NL
Learning Objectives

1. To provide insights into the role of imaging, and radiographers, in forensic imaging and mass fatality incidents.
2. To appreciate the key aspects of a quality forensic imaging service.
3. To understand the challenges associated with forensic imaging.

Abstract

Forensic radiology and imaging is a relatively new field within the realm of forensic science and medicine. This introduction provides a short overview of the scientific challenges facing the forensic radiological technician radiologist.

A-039
08:35
A. Disaster victim identification
J. Kroll; Maastricht/NL
Learning Objectives

1. To appreciate the role of forensic radiology in a disaster victim identification process.
2. To learn about the methods using forensic radiology in a disaster victim identification process.
3. To discuss added value of forensic radiology in a disaster victim identification process.

Abstract

Forensic radiology, mainly as a tool for forensic odontology, has long been an essential discipline in the post-mortem identification of human remains. Because forensic radiology is a rapidly developing field due to the fast technical developments of CT scanners, the possible applications are increasing. A whole body CT contains a wealth of identification information that can be used in an identification process. This presentation will highlight the contribution of forensic radiology within a DVI process, discussing its applications, equipment, advantages and positioning within a DVI-process. It will also discuss future developments, opportunities and challenges which futures DVI processes will face.

A-040
08:58
B. The role of CT angiography in forensic imaging
A. Dominguez; Lausanne/CH
Learning Objectives

1. To learn about the development of multiphase post-mortem CT angiography (MPMCTA).
2. To appreciate the benefits and limitations of MPMCTA examinations.
3. To understand the role of the radiographer in the MPMCTA.

Abstract

Multiphase post-mortem CT angiography (MPMCTA) has been set up almost ten years ago at the University Center of Legal Medicine of Lausanne-Geneva, Switzerland (CURML). A research project allowed the creation of the Virtangio® device: a specific injection system for post-mortem angiography. Nowadays, this setting is regularly used as almost a third of the autopsies benefit of this technique at the CURML. The indication to perform the MPMCTA is the suspicion of vascular lesions due to natural or traumatic origin, such as traffic accidents, homicides (stab wounds, ballistic), medical malpractice (especially in a post-surgery context), or unexpected adults death. This procedure allows examining vascular anatomy: analyses of the vascular lumen with potential stenosis or dilatation; analyse of the vascular walls with potential dissections or ruptures; characterization of the nature of an arterial and/or venous leakage. It also permits to obtain morphological information of the organs parenchyma. At the CURML, the MPMCTA is fully executed by the forensic radiographer. He is in charge of preparing the body, collecting samples before the angiography, denudating the arterial and venous vessels for the injections and proceeding the CT-scan acquisition. The duration of this technique lasting about 30 minutes won’t disturb the investigation work flow. The MPMCTA is then interpreted by a team involving forensic pathologist and a radiologist. Limitations and pitfalls of this technique should be known to identify artefacts and pitfalls.

A-041
09:21
C. The importance of the radiographer's role in forensic imaging
A. L. Brookes; London/GB
Learning Objectives

1. To appreciate the role of the radiographer in forensic imaging.
2. To learn about the importance of continuity of evidence and record keeping.
3. To discuss the various situations a radiographer can be exposed to during forensic imaging.

Abstract

Forensic imaging is an ever-expanding sub-speciality of both radiology and forensic medicine. The overall role of forensic imaging is to obtain evidence and answer legal questions associated with either living or deceased individuals. Forensic imaging can be utilised in a variety of cases including suspected physical abuse, medical negligence, drug trafficking and mass fatalities incidents. In forensic pathology, forensic imaging has established a role in the assessment of identification and establishment of cause of death, particularly in cases of severely decomposed or burnt remains. The role of radiographers within forensic imaging contrasts significantly with that of the routine clinical environment. Those individuals involved in forensic imaging must understand and be aware of the medico-legal features and professional guidelines that impact their practice.

09:44
Panel discussion: Developing a service/getting involved in forensic imaging
Abstract

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