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ESR/UEMS - Imaging professionals in the EU: radiologists without borders
Education Management/Leadership Professional Issues
Thursday, February 28, 08:30 - 10:00
Room: X
Type of session: Joint Session of the ESR and UEMS
Topic: Education, Management/Leadership, Professional Issues
Moderators: M. Adriaensen (Heerlen/NL), L. Bonomo (Rome/IT)

A-0211
08:30
Chairpersons' introduction (part 1)
M. Adriaensen; Heerlen/NL
Learning Objectives

1. To describe the role of the UEMS within the EU.
2. To understand the difference between the ESR and the UEMS.
3. To understand the importance of cooperation between the ESR and the UEMS.

Abstract

The UEMS (European Union of Medical Specialists) is the oldest European medical organisation representing the interests of more than 50 different medical specialities and involving more than 1.6 million healthcare professionals. The ESR (European Society of Radiology) is the world’s biggest radiological society, encompassing more than 82,000 members from 161 different countries. It was founded in 2005 by merging the European Congress of Radiology and the European Association of Radiology, aiming at establishing a single, powerful and unified voice for European radiologists. Through the section of radiology of the UEMS, UEMS and ESR share the same ambitious objective of promoting the highest quality of care and medical practice in radiology, by serving the needs of patients and the general public, harmonising radiological training and defending free movement and professional interests of European radiologists. This Joint Session will focus on the concept and importance of advocacy at the level of the European Union, with specific emphasis on the value of qualifications across borders and the consequences of a Brexit. With regard to harmonisation of radiological training, the revised European Training Curriculum will be discussed. Furthermore, you will be informed how to gain European recognition for your degree in radiology as well as for your radiology department. Finally, particular attention will be dedicated to the working methodologies of EACCME (European Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education) and ACI (Accreditation Council in Imaging) in the framework of CME (Continuing Medical Education) and CPD (Continuing Professional Development) programmes.

A-0212
08:33
Chairpersons' introduction (part 2)
L. Bonomo; Rome/IT
Learning Objectives

1. To describe the role of the UEMS within the EU.
2. To understand the difference between the ESR and the UEMS.
3. To understand the importance of cooperation between the ESR and the UEMS.

A-0213
08:35
Putting your interests first: UEMS and ESR advocacy in the EU (part 1)
P. M. Parizel; Antwerp/BE
Learning Objectives

1. To understand the structure of the UEMS and the ESR.
2. To understand the differences between the ESR and the UEMS.
3. To understand the importance of UEMS/ESR political involvement in EU affairs.

Abstract

The ESR was founded in 2005 by merging the European Congress of Radiology (ECR) and the Europan Association of Radiology (EAR) to adequately represent a unified and powerful voice for European radiologists. In recent years, the EU institutions have increasingly shaped policies in the fields of health, research and digitalisation, which has impacted clinical practice for radiologists and biomedical research across the Member States. Under the guidance of the Board of Directors, the ESR closely monitors and assesses EU legislation and policy developments to ensure EU initiatives benefit clinical practice and patient safety. Equipped with a toolbox of instruments, the ESR participates in EU stakeholder consultations, regularly organises policy events and issues statements and position papers to get across the radiologists‘ point of view. Taking into account the complex EU policymaking arena, the ESR has adopted a proactive approach by successfully establishing good working relations with the EU institutions and engaging with other stakeholders active in the fields of health and research. In this respect, the ESR is widely recognised as a major healthcare stakeholder that has successfully promoted the interests of the radiology profession and patient safety at the pan-European level. As collaboration is the key to success at EU level, the ESR is grateful to have found a respected partner in the UEMS to jointly defend the interests of the medical profession and to strive for the highest standards in healthcare, teaching and research.

A-0214
08:40
Putting your interests first: UEMS and ESR advocacy in the EU (part 2)
B. Maillet; Brussels/BE
Learning Objectives

1. To understand the structure of the UEMS and the ESR.
2. To understand the differences between the ESR and the UEMS.
3. To understand the importance of UEMS/ESR political involvement in EU affairs.

Abstract

One of the basic principles of the European Union is Free Movement. Of course, this concerns people, products, funds manpower but also Healthcare and can be found in this particular field in three domains. First the free movement of students organised by the Bologna Process, the free movement of physicians organised by the EU Directive on Professional Qualification Recognition (PQR) and recently the free movement of patients organised by the EU Directive on Patient Safety on Cross Border Healthcare. Concerning the PQR the first initiative was in 1993 with the first version of the Directive that was amended regularly with the last revision in 2013 (EC 2013/55), but the most important version is the EC 2005/35. This Directive recognises automatically the Diplomas of Medicine between the different Member States and also grants recognition for some specialities. The Directives have to be revised every seven years, and the next scheduled revision is planned in 2020, so this would be the ideal moment to try to “fuse” those both specialities and have only “Radiology” mentioned in Annex V and abolish “Diagnostic Radiology”. A joint effort of both the UEMS and the ESR could be considered to achieve this revision.

Part 1: What does the EU mean for me? A radiologist's guide
A-0215
08:45
To be or not to be at the table: why advocacy matters for radiologists
K. Riklund; Umea/SE
Learning Objectives

1. To understand the concept of advocacy and the importance of advocacy at the EU level.
2. To understand the three levels of the European Legislation process.
3. To understand the influence of EU directives on national legislation and daily practice.

Abstract

ESR and UEMS Radiology section work together for better patient care, harmonised professional and standards. The radiological community os affected by developments in healthcare and financial constraints for healthcare spending together with a growing demand of healthcare combined with an under-representation of the radiologist in decision making and emerging value-based concept. In the talk the need for coordinated actions to an activator for the highest standard of patient care in radiology will be discussed. We will work all through the three levels of the European legislation process and the representation of ESR in EU networks and stakeholder groups.

A-0216
08:53
Creating a European radiology (or healthcare) workforce: the value of qualifications across borders
S. Berger1, H. Käfer1, M. Frohn2; 1Vienna/AT 2Brussels/BE
Learning Objectives

1. To understand the concept of advocacy and the importance of advocacy at the EU level.
2. To understand the three levels of the European Legislation process.
3. To understand the influence of EU directives on national legislation and daily practice.

Abstract

EU Member-States are free to regulate professions and thus restrict access of certain professions on their territory, as long as they respect the principles of non-discrimination and proportionality under EU law. From this derives that EU law does not primarily seek to harmonise professional qualifications and access to professions. This exists only in a few areas, such as transport and health. For doctors, Directive 2005/36/EC on the recognition of professional qualifications foresees minimum harmonisation of training based on years and hours of study and acquired knowledge and skills, which entail an automatic recognition mechanism. This applies to doctors with basic medical education, general practitioners and currently 54 medical specialist categories including radiology and diagnostic radiology, given that the professional is fully qualified in its home Member-State. Evidence of formal qualifications in medical specialist training, which are covered by the automatic recognition system, are listed in point 5.1.3. of Annex V to the Directive. For the remaining medical specialisations, EU law provides recognition mechanism with Directive 2005/36/EC, based on the principle of mutual recognition of professional qualifications. This kind of recognition allows the host Member-State to compare the substance of training and in case of substantial differences, to impose compensation measures in the form of an aptitude test or an adaptation period. Doctors are the most mobile profession in Europe under the Directive when it comes to recognition for the purpose of a permanent establishment with more than 3500 recognition decisions per year throughout Europe, including the EEA and CH.

A-0217
09:01
Brexit means Brexit: radiologists with borders?
V. Papalois; London/GB
Learning Objectives

1. To understand the concept of advocacy and the importance of advocacy at the EU level.
2. To understand the three levels of the European Legislation process.
3. To understand the influence of EU directives on national legislation and daily practice.

Part 2: Educating the next generation of radiologists
A-0218
09:09
The benefits of harmonised training for the radiologists of tomorrow
C. Catalano; Rome/IT
Learning Objectives

1. To get an overview of the different levels and the changes made in the revised European Training Curriculum in radiology.
2. To learn about the Council for European Specialist Medical Assessment (CESMA).
3. To know about the value of the European Diploma in Radiology (EDiR).
4. To learn about the facts and figures of the European Training Assessment Programme (ETAP) 2.0.

Abstract

One of the aims of the ESR is to harmonise and standardise training all over Europe. A major effort has been done in the past few years in the preparation of the European Training Curricula and the Undergraduate Training Curriculum, which have recently been updated and received the endorsement of the UEMS. The ETC defined the contents of training and expected learning outcomes of trainees in radiology. The ETC is a living document continuously revised in order to keep up with the developments and knowledge in radiology. The CESMA is an advisory body of the UEMS created to provide recommendation and advice on the organisation of European examinations for European medical specialists. The ESR has therefore developed the EDiR which is available to radiologists and last year radiology residents. It certifies that their level of knowledge and competency is in line with the ETC. The EDiR is an additional qualification of excellence for general radiology, fully endorsed by the UEMS and the ESR. The European Training Assessment Programme (ETAP) has been recently updated to a version 2.0, based on a new platform, which enables a quick and easy online certification process for both applicants and assessors. ETAP 2.0 ensures that the training department meets the quality of standards set by the ESR European Training Curriculum and the UEMS. All these activities of the ESR aim at improving throughout Europe the level of knowledge of Radiologists and Radiologists in training by standardising training.

A-0219
09:17
Making your qualifications count at home and abroad: the European Diploma in Radiology and the CESMA
H. J. Lamb; Leiden/NL
Learning Objectives

1. To get an overview of the different levels and the changes made in the revised European Training Curriculum in radiology.
2. To learn about the Council for European Specialist Medical Assessment (CESMA).
3. To know about the value of the European Diploma in Radiology (EDiR).
4. To learn about the facts and figures of the European Training Assessment Programme (ETAP) 2.0.

Abstract

Short informative presentation on the structure, organisation, outcome and future projections for the European Diploma in Radiology (EDiR). Furthermore, short overview of the different levels and the changes made in the revised European Training Curriculum in radiology. Also an introduction to the Council for European Specialist Medical Assessment (CESMA). Finally, facts and figures will be discussed of the European Training Assessment Programme (ETAP) 2.0.

A-0220
09:25
ETAP 2.0
L. Oleaga Zufiría; Barcelona/ES
Learning Objectives

1. To get an overview of the different levels and the changes made in the revised European Training Curriculum in radiology.
2. To learn about the Council for European Specialist Medical Assessment (CESMA).
3. To know about the value of the European Diploma in Radiology (EDiR).
4. To learn about the facts and figures of the European Training Assessment Programme (ETAP) 2.0.

Abstract

The European Training Assessment Programme (ETAP) is a joint initiative of the European Society of Radiology (ESR) and the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS) Radiology section, with the aim of assessing and harmonising the radiology training department programmes in Europe. A qualitative adaptation was made in 2016 modifying the structure of a face-to-face audit to an online audit to facilitate access to a larger number of centres and lighten the work of the assessors, establishing as ETAP 2.0 programme. ETAP 2.0 represents an instrument for the centres to compare the quality of the training and assess the suitability of the program with the European Training Curriculum (ETC). It is strongly linked with the European Diploma of Radiology (EDIR); ETAP 2.0 is a certificate of excellence for training institutions that ensure that their training department meets the quality standards set by the European Society of Radiology and the UEMS. Both initiatives favour the standardisation of the European training, and they both contribute to increase the quality of training across Europe. The differential element of the ETAP 2.0 is its platform, which enables a quick and easy certification process for both applicants and assessors. Representatives of the applicant institutions and the assessors can easily and efficiently store, access and manage all documents and information necessary for the certification process.ETAP 2.0 offers training centres an opportunity to audit their programme as an instrument to check the level of competence, attitude and development of new skills the trainees acquire during the training period.

Part 3: Staying ahead of the curve with continuing professional development (CPD)
A-0221
09:33
Patient safety and job security for life: CME/CPD in Europe
P. Ricci; Rome/IT
Learning Objectives

1. To learn about the European Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (EACCME).
2. To know about the existence of European CME credits (ECMEC).
3. To learn about the importance of credits in different European countries.

Abstract

CME - Continuing Medical Education - consists of educational activities which serve to maintain, develop, or increase the knowledge, skills, and professional performance and relationships that a physician uses to provide services for patients, the public, or the profession. CPD - Continuing Professional Development - can be defined as the systematic maintenance, improvement and continuous acquisition or reinforcement of the lifelong knowledge, skills and competencies of health professionals. CME-CPD is a clinical and professional duty as well as an ethical obligation for healthcare professionals. It can also be a powerful instrument free from commercial influence in the hands of the medical class which is extremely necessary in the European Union, where healthcare systems became inter-dependent, yet still inhomogeneous, with mandatory and voluntary CME-CPD systems coexisting side by side. At EU-level, the role of CPD to help safeguard patient safety within the context of cross-border mobility has been addressed in several legal instruments: e.g. Council Recommendation on Patient Safety, Directive 2011/24/EU on patients' rights in cross-border healthcare, and Directive 2013/55/EU on the recognition of professional qualifications. The UEMS - European Union of Medical Specialists actively promotes high standards in CME-CPD through the European Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (EACCME), created in 1999 with the aim of encouraging high standards in development, delivery and harmonisation of CME through the international accreditation of events, and the establishment of a “currency” system for the international acceptance of CME credits (ECMEC - 1 ECMEC = 1 hour of CME).

A-0222
09:41
It's easier than you think: the many ways to gain European CME/CPD credits
M. A. Lucic; Sremska Kamenica/RS
Learning Objectives

1. To learn about the European Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (EACCME).
2. To know about the existence of European CME credits (ECMEC).
3. To learn about the importance of credits in different European countries.

Abstract

Understanding the tendency of Continuing Medical Education (CME) shift from voluntary to mandatory within Europe, European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS) and its European Accreditation Council for CME (EACCME) introduced European Continuing Medical Education Credits (ECMEC’s), as CME "tokens" reflecting objectively the CME activity, that facilitate the exchange of CME credits between European countries and comparable systems outside Europe. Considering CME as educational activities which serve to maintain, develop or increase the knowledge, skills, professional performance and relationships that physician/radiologist uses to provide services for patients or profession, ECMEC's are awarded for both live educational events, and e-learning materials, but from recently also for Continuing Professional Development (CPD), defined as the educative means of updating, developing and enhancing how physicians apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes required in their working lives. As CPD incorporates and goes beyond CME, EACCME 2.0, adopted in 2016, enabled EACCME recognition of the several CPD/CME activities, that includes reviewing and/or publishing scientific and educational material, learning by teaching, and examining in UEMS exams, including EDiR exam. Based on the surveys conducted by Accreditation Council in Imaging (ACI) during the last two years, that provided not only valuable information on accreditation systems differences in European countries, but more important, indicated important standpoints of the European radiology community, that include the recognition of ECMEC’s as universal European CME "tokens", and unification of CME/CPD systems within Europe, and shall be acknowledged as the "voice of European radiologists" in future considerations.

09:49
Panel discussion: The state of radiology in the EU: a diagnosis of "the bigger picture"
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