Powered by
05:54 CET
EFRS WS - Growing radiography research
Education Professional Issues Radiographers Research
Saturday, March 2, 14:00 - 15:30
Room: C
Type of session: EFRS Workshop
Topic: Education, Professional Issues, Radiographers, Research
Moderators: J. McNulty (Dublin/IE), J. M. Nightingale (Sheffield/GB)

A-0860
14:00
Radiography research: where should we be in 2030? (part 1)
L. Rainford; Dublin/IE
Learning Objectives

1. To explore the changing landscape in medical imaging and how this might influence our research.
2. To consider the future radiography profession, what it might look like and where it might lead our research.
3. To propose some research targets for our profession to work towards over the next decade.

Abstract

The scope of medical imaging and its many sub-specialities has grown substantially over the past two decades. How medical imaging is employed by medical specialities, outside radiology has also altered the clinical use of imaging across medical centres and primary care settings internationally. Healthcare systems are developing to meet the changing needs of patients. There is a need for an evidence base of practice across all medical imaging activity to ensure optimal use. As multiple medical specialities, e.g. cardiology, rheumatology, orthopaedics, emergency medicine clinicians, to name a few, are involved in imaging on a daily basis, the scope of potential research activity is immense. Additionally, there is an increased use by other healthcare professionals such as physiotherapy and midwifery. An overview of this changing landscape will be discussed.

A-0861
14:08
Radiography research: where should we be in 2030? (part 2)
G. Paulo; Coimbra/PT
Learning Objectives

1. To explore the changing landscape in medical imaging and how this might influence our research.
2. To consider the future radiography profession, what it might look like and where it might lead our research.
3. To propose some research targets for our profession to work towards over the next decade.

Abstract

There is no doubt that the only way to develop a professional field of knowledge is through research and Radiography is even more dependent on it, due to the exponential technological development of its field. In fact, we need to stop, watch and listen, to understand where these new technological roads will take us. One thing is certain: our profession will not be the same in 2030 and universities demonstrate some difficulties in anticipating what the future will bring, to be able to adapt the education models to incorporate the changes arising. Technology is taking over most of the decisions we have to make in our daily clinical practice, and therefore we have an obligation to, through research, develop new competencies in the fields where technology will never take over our role: It’s “The human touch”.Radiographers will have to understand that patient safety (understood in a broad concept) and communication skills are the main pillars of our profession and developing them is the only way to keep our profession alive. Therefore, there is an urgent need to bring together professional societies and universities on a global summit, to establish an international strategic research agenda for radiography, as an instrument to develop our profession, anticipating the impact of the new technological advancements in our field of knowledge.

A-0862
14:16
Radiography research: where should we be in 2030? (part 3)
H. Precht; Odense/DK
Learning Objectives

1. To explore the changing landscape in medical imaging and how this might influence our research.
2. To consider the future radiography profession, what it might look like and where it might lead our research.
3. To propose some research targets for our profession to work towards over the next decade.

Abstract

To support radiography research growth in the future different several elements require consideration. First radiography research should align with modern hospital structures and practices, with a focus on multidisciplinary cooperation to produce new knowledge. Radiography research needs to broad in activity to include, for example, cardiology, forensic medicine, midwifery, machine learning, robot technology, in addition to traditional radiography research subjects. Universities and colleges with Radiography training programmes need to support and advance research activity. Realistic targets could be that Radiography programmes are involved in research work within a specific time-frame, over the next five years to develop research networks. The OPTIMAX model demonstrates a good model for collaborative research; this can be developed nationally between colleges or on a larger scale across colleges in different countries. Staff research portfolios are important and should be public, to highlight the activity and cooperation within our profession. It is important to note that promoting radiography research is to the benefit of patients and is essential to maintain high standards of patient management.

A-0863
14:24
The clinical research radiographer: essential for our profession or facilitating the research of others?
B. Snaith; Wakefield/GB
Learning Objectives

1. To understand the scope of a research radiographer in clinical practice.
2. To learn how the role can improve clinical research capacity and capability and clinical-academic collaboration.
3. To appreciate the difference between research facilitation and the radiographer as a clinical researcher.

Abstract

Radiography is developing a research community, supporting the profession to gain capability in research skills. The majority of this activity is taking place in academia, yet research is required to develop evidence-based practice. Radiographers are supporting the delivery of research projects through clinical activity, recruitment and support, but are yet to develop clinical independence in research. This presentation will consider the challenges and opportunities for the development of clinical researcher roles, skills and activities. Using case studies examples from practice will explore the challenges and identify future strategies to support personal and professional development.

A-0864
14:42
Turning your research idea into reality: opportunities for European funding
P. Zolda; Vienna/AT
Learning Objectives

1. To learn about EIBIR and its services for researchers.
2. To understand project management and dissemination activities of European projects.
3. To appreciate how EIBIR can support your research project.

Abstract

Many national funding schemes do not support a cross-border approach, which limits the scientific collaboration of European research groups. Thus researchers rely on European Union funding sources as provided by Horizon 2020, the largest EU research and innovation programme. However, the programme has become highly competitive, and often even high-quality project proposals cannot be funded. Additionally, successful projects are facing the challenge of navigating through the rules of large EU projects while simultaneously carrying out innovative research with partners from across Europe. Consequently, multidisciplinary and multinational consortia require professional support for proposal preparation and project management. The European Institute for Biomedical Imaging Research, EIBIR, is a non-profit organisation founded by the European Society of Radiology and supports researchers and industry partners in the coordination of biomedical imaging research. EIBIR offers expert advice, professional project management and coordination, as well as dissemination services for international collaborative research projects. The EIBIR services also include advice on funding opportunities and proposal writing support by an experienced team with knowledge of the European Commission's requirements. Through EIBIR`s large landscape of network members, shareholder organisations, industry partners and media contacts the conducted research is widely and rapidly communicated. EIBIR is currently a partner and/or coordinator of seven Horizon 2020 projects and relieves researchers of the administrative burden, allowing them to focus on the scientific aspects and thereby ensuring the best project outcome. All services are free of charge for active EIBIR network members and can be used for a moderate annual fee.

A-0865
15:00
Research is nothing without effective dissemination
F. Zarb; Msida/MT
Learning Objectives

1. To explore the importance of dissemination at the local, national and international level.
2. To explore the importance of publishing for clinical and academic departments.
3. To consider the benefits and limitations of publishing in different journal formats.

Abstract

Research is the contribution to the body of knowledge in a particular area/expertise. Research findings should be disseminated, shared and made available to fellow professionals and others for these findings to have an overall beneficial effect. There are a number of ways for disseminating research findings such as through peer-reviewed publication, conference presentations, posters etc. This presentation aims to highlight the importance of research finding dissemination for both the individual researcher/practitioner and to the clinical/academic departments and countries they represent. The dissemination process may not always seem easy and straightforward, requiring a commitment and perseverance in the work it entails. However, the benefits and satisfaction associated with research dissemination outweigh the hard work involved.

15:18
Panel discussion: What are the biggest barriers to growing radiographer-led research?
This website uses cookies. Learn more